Day 3 – Heritage Rail Trail & Torrey C. Brown Trail: Railroad, PA to Cockeysville, MD (22.6 miles)

Garden Waterfall
@ Jackson House

This morning, we fastened our panniers on the bikes before breakfast so that we could get an earlier start. Again, breakfast at the Jackson House was fabulous – eggs Benedict, grapefruit, and fresh blueberries & local cherries 🙂 . Pam, the owner of the B&B joined us for breakfast this morning, and we enjoyed listening to her describe the history of the 1859 inn which she and her husband have managed for the past ten years. Before breakfast, she let us take a quick tour of all three floors; each room has a private bath and is decorated in Pennsylvania Dutch style with beautiful antiques and handmade quilts.

Gunpowder River

After breakfast, just before 9 AM, we started biking south. Our return trek to Cockeysville was approximately 22 miles and mostly downhill, except the first 1 ½ mile climb to New Freedom. As soon as we passed the state line, we started descending; I actually reached a speed of almost 15 mph, even carrying the loaded panniers. The Torrey Trail is much narrower than the Heritage Trail in Pennsylvania; it alternates between two lanes separated by a strip of grass to a single track. We stopped at the Monkton Station for a brief restroom break and met a local man who bikes the trail twice a week. I can’t imagine the luxury of living so close to a Hall-of-Fame trail!

Monkton Station

After Monkton, we pedaled the remaining 7 miles to Hunt Valley LLC where we had rented the bikes two days ago. The owner greeted us, offering to help us unload our gear and volunteering to drive us two miles to the Pennsylvania Dutch Market in Hunt Valley where we ate lunch and bought gifts to take back home. The Walmart-sized market was filled with Amish furniture, a bakery, and a smorgasbord of food prepared with fresh local produce. What a treat! Based on TripAdvisor recommendations, we both decided to order chocolate chip cheesecake for lunch. We purchased sampler-sized jellies that can be carried on the plane and then ate our cheesecake while sitting on the beautiful, handcrafted Amish rocking chairs in front of the market.

Pennsylvania Dutch Market

Prior to our trip, Dotty, one of our Clayton State retiree friends, insisted that we locate and purchase Berger cookies before returning to Atlanta. The shortbread cookies smothered in chocolate fudge icing are baked in Baltimore and sold in many of the local Maryland grocery stores. According to Berger’s website, the Giant store, located a few blocks north of the Amish market, carries the cookies. So, to fulfill our promise to Dotty, we schlepped our panniers through parking lots and along the sidewalks to the grocery store. After each purchasing two large boxes of the cookies, we realized that the outdoor heat would probably melt the icing before we could reach the Baltimore airport. One of the store clerks overheard our conversation and offered to bring us small bags of ice to place underneath the cookies 🙂 .

Realizing that the lite rail was due in about 15 minutes, we walked as fast as our 60-70 something legs would carry us in the 80+ heat to the Pepper Station. As we approached the loading platform, we saw a digital sign indicating that the next train would arrive in 2 minutes. In a state of panic and not wanting to wait an additional 30 minutes for the next train, we attempted to purchase an MTA card. Neither of us were successful at navigating the confusing, complicated machines which dispensed the tickets. Fortunately, Joyce noticed an announcement on the screen indicating that the MTA was offering free fares during a two week period in June, including today! By then, a train approached and we boarded it without giving thought to the fact that it might be headed in the wrong direction. Before reaching the next station, we asked a few of the passengers if we were on the train to the airport, and they directed us to the train on the adjacent track approaching from the opposite direction. We quickly deboarded, crossed the platform to the other side, and jumped onto the other train. Collapsing into our seats and unloading our 20 lb panniers onto the seat in front of us, we sat back and enjoyed the 90 minute ride to the airport. Although we had to walk at least a mile to our gate, there were separate security checkpoints for each concourse, which made the check-in process much faster and allowed us to reach our gate almost an hour prior to our flight.

While reflecting on our three-day trip, I am extremely thankful for good health which allows Joyce and me to make these journeys. As long as we are physically able and our husbands are willing, I think both of us are committed to biking as many trails as our bodies will allow!

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3 thoughts on “Day 3 – Heritage Rail Trail & Torrey C. Brown Trail: Railroad, PA to Cockeysville, MD (22.6 miles)

  1. What’s a pannier? How do you find the B&B that you want to visit? I would love to visit one but am sort of reluctant.

    • Panniers are bike bags that fasten to a rack on the rear fender enabling you to carry clothes & gear for an overnight trip. If you do a Google search for “bike panniers,” you will find several styles and sizes.

      I usually search for hotels or B&Bs near the bike trail and then look at TripAdvisor for reviews. I’ve located several nice accommodations by reading comments on trail websites, including Trail Link (traillink.com) and Rails-to-Trails (railstotrails.org).

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